Booster Jabs

It’s something which has been long forgotten in this family. The last time Lily had her jabs done was at about two years old, but now, we’re at the stage where the pre-school booster is upon us!

I used to hate taking Lily for jabs. I don’t think anyone likes to see their newborn have a needle poked into them, but you sort of had the comfort of giving them a bottle afterwards and a walk home to calm them and soothe them back to sleep. That is NEVER going to work this time. Oh no. Lily is an independent, extremely self-aware young girl and I am dreading how we’re going to get through this.

Firstly, I’m scared she will see the needle and refuse. She’s not silly and distracting her from that won’t be easy, but I’m also worried about the effects. As a baby, Lily would be that baby that was quite groggy and grumpy after her jabs and a part of me feels she will be the same this time, just mixed with the ordinary threenager strops and slight attitude. I’m not sure my tired, essay stressed nerves could cope.

vaccination-1215279_1280

Secondly, this is the pre-school booster…PRE-SCHOOL. That’s scary! She’s three. I know she’s clever and very grown up for age, but the thought of her going to primary school (September 2018, not that I’m keeping track or anything) is terrifying! I’m not sure I’m prepared to be a school run, playground mum quite yet. I only left school six years ago, I don’t want to go back!

Lastly, it just goes against the natural parenting instinct. I would never stop Lily having her vaccinations. They’re so important to keeping her healthy, but the mothering side of me wants to protect her form someone essentially stabbing her with a needle.

Parents guide to vaccinations (UK)

Keeping up with your child’s vaccinations is important, but it can be really confusing. I know that I only really remember them when my GP send me a letter to book them. Below is a small timeline to help you follow their progression.

8 weeks old – Your newborn will be given a 5-in-1 vaccine. This single job is for protection against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b. They will also be given the first does of the rotavirus, MenB and pneumococcal jabs

12 weeks old – At this stage, your child will have the second dose of the 5-in-1 and a rotavirus vaccine top up.

16 weeks old – Third dose of the 5-in-1 and the second jabs for MenB and pneumococcal.

One year old – This is the next stage of vaccinations including Hib/MenC vaccination, measles, mumps and rubella, pneumococcal and MenB.

3 years 4 months old – This is made up of two jabs. The first is the top up for measles, mumps and rubella while the second is a 4-in-1 pre-school booster containing vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and polio.

You’ll also find that from the ages of 2-7 years old, your child can have the annual children’s flu vaccination. You can learn more about this and the other vaccinations mentioned by either contacting your GP, health visitor or by looking on the NHS website.  Alternatively, you can find them inside your child’s Red Book. 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s